Energy Price increases to come due to Government Policies

GHP.ie Comment:  There is much talk about the “fines” Ireland will pay as we fail to achieve our Climate Change targets for 2020, 2030 and 2050.  Both businesses and householders must stop thinking about this as some sort of national fine – any penalties Ireland has to pay will be paid by consumers in the form of increased energy taxes, in one form or other.  It is important that businesses especially engage in this debate and demand action from government to take action that will minimise these fines – the closure of the peat burning power stations and the conversion of Moneypoint to natural gas would be major positive steps.

This article from the Irish Times, 15/6/18, delivers the message well….

For peat’s sake, climate change policy is crazy

John FitzGerald

Ireland’s greenhouse gas emissions are steadily rising, and the EPA projects a continuous increase for most of the next decade. As a result, not only are we certain to miss our 2020 goal for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, we are also more likely to miss our 2030 target. Our 2050 commitment under the Paris agreement – to largely decarbonise the economy – is also in serious jeopardy unless the situation is rapidly redressed.

Each year, the agency publishes two sets of projections – one on the basis of existing policies and another taking account of “additional measures” that have been agreed during the previous year, but are not yet implemented. It was very striking that the additional measures announced last year, which the EPA numbers took into account, actually made things worse.

This is the first time that policy in a particular year has actually added to the problem of global warming rather than making a positive, though limited, contribution to reducing emissions. It should be noted, however, that the EPA’s projections do not yet factor in any positive benefits from the National Development Plan.

The key factor behind this perverse turn in climate policy, identified in the EPA numbers, was the decision to continue subsidising peat-fired electricity generation stations through to 2030. Peat is the most damaging fuel in terms of global warming, even worse than coal.

Very damaging

As well as being very damaging from an environmental point of view, generating electricity from peat is also uneconomic. This year, consumers are paying around €3.50 on every electricity bill to subsidise the continued use of peat for power generation. This “public service obligation” is justified on the basis that it supports employment in the midlands and energy security, albeit at the cost of much higher emissions of greenhouse gases.

The total sum involved amounts to a subsidy of more than €100 million a year to peat generation. Currently a little under a thousand people in Bord na Móna are employed on supplying peat for electricity.

Thus the current subsidy per job involved is at least €100,000 a year. The Bord na Móna annual report indicates that, in the year 2016/2017, its workers’ average pay was €50,000. In other words, the subsidy per job is around twice what the workers involved actually earn.

If the peat-fired power stations were closed tomorrow, and the workers involved continued to be employed on their current wages, subsidising these jobs would only cost €50 million, not €100 million. Electricity consumers would pay less to subsidise these jobs, and Ireland’s greenhouse gas emissions would fall substantially as a result of discontinuing this polluting fuel use.

The EPA’s figures also make clear that emissions of greenhouse gases from peat-fired electricity generation is only part of the environmental damage that will arise over the coming decade from continuing this activity.

The current policy is to substitute wood (biomass) for some of the peat used in generating electricity. By using this wood in peat-fired power stations, Ireland risks missing its obligation to develop renewable sources of heat, and may attract significant EU penalties as a result.

Wet bogland is an important carbon sink, where bogs take carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and fix it in peat. This feature is lost when turf is harvested and dried, even before further carbon is released when burnt to generate power.

The new plan to keep peat-fired electricity going till 2030 is a lose-lose-lose policy. It will add significantly to Ireland’s greenhouse gas emissions, it will cost the people of Ireland a lot of money, and it will see less carbon dioxide being absorbed into our peat bogs.

This is misguided policy. We should plan for the closure by 2020 of peat-fired generation. A limited amount of the saving on subsidies could be used to develop alternative sustainable employment for those currently working in the sector. This would greatly benefit the environment, it would save electricity consumers a lot of money, and it would protect the livelihoods of those who are currently employed in the midlands harvesting peat – a win-win-win.

 

New Research: Big Opportunity for Corporations to Gain Loyalty Through Sustainability

LeanPath – Food Waste Minimisation – BY CJ BONGE, MARKETING COORDINATOR // JUNE 4, 2018

New research shows that Americans care deeply about sustainability but are facing an overwhelming feeling of helplessness in the face of such a large issue. The upshot: people are depending on corporations to drive sustainability, and rewarding companies that do with loyalty.

The Shelton Group, a communications firm focused on sustainability, found that 88 percent of Americans believe people should take actions to reduce environmental impact. But it also found that over 60 percent of those Americans will pick comfort over taking actions to protect the environment (no wonder the national recycling rate is only 35 percent).

So they are outsourcing their desire for sustainability to corporations:

  • 59 percent of millennials look to companies to solve social and environmental problems they feel they can’t address (or would rather not have to).
  • 64 percent of Americans say a company’s environmental reputation impacts their purchase decisions.
  • 60 percent of Americans say corporate social responsibility activities positively impact their purchase intent.
  • Nearly one-fifth of Americans can now name a brand they’ve purchased – or not purchased – because of the environmental record of the manufacturer.
  • 45 percent of Americans wish to be seen as someone who buys eco-friendly products, a percentage that has grown steadily over the last six years.

Looking for a way to get in on the action and leverage sustainability to drive brand loyalty? Here’s your official invitation. One of the highest profile routes to increasing corporate sustainability is food waste prevention. Food waste is a global crisis that has drastic environmental, social, and economic impact, and the whole world is buzzing about it. Huge names in national and international business are already engaged in preventing food waste while increasing their margins and creating meaningful PR around their boost in corporate social responsibility. The shift in global consumer behavior toward sustainable companies is underway. How has your team positioned itself to be the sustainable leader your consumers want to follow?

European Commission Proposes Ban on Single-Use Plastic Items

European Commission single-use plastic ban

The European Commission is proposing a ban on single-use plastic items like straws and utensils according to draft rules released this week. The legislation, which needs the approval of all member states and the European Parliament, would also require plastic producers pay for cleanup and waste management, CNN Money reported.

EU-wide rules target 10 single-use plastic products that the commission says make up 70% of marine litter items. The ban will apply to cotton swabs, cutlery, plates, straws, drink stirrers, and balloon sticks, meaning those products would need to be made exclusively from more sustainable materials.

“The European Commission estimates that these rules, once fully implemented in 2030, could cost businesses over $3.5 billion per year,” Alanna Petroff wrote. “But they could also save consumers about $7.6 billion per year, create 30,000 jobs, and avoid $25.6 billion in environmental damage and cleanup costs.”

The proposed rules also say:

  • Producers will help cover the costs of waste management and cleanup as well as awareness raising measures for food containers, packets and wrappers, drinks containers and cups, tobacco products with filters, wet wipes, balloons, and lightweight plastic bags
  • The industry will be given incentives to develop less polluting alternatives for products
  • Certain products like sanitary towels, wet wipes, and balloons will require a clear and standardized labeling showing how waste should be disposed, the negative environmental impact of the product, and the presence of plastics in them

Under the new rules, EU member states must reduce the use of plastic food containers and drinks cups by setting national reduction targets, making alternative products available at the point of sale, or ensuring that single-use plastic products cannot be provided free of charge. Member states will also be required to raise consumer awareness about single-use plastics and collect 90% of single-use plastic drink bottles by 2025.

In January, the European Commission announced plans to make all plastic packaging recyclable by 2030.
Around the same time, a number of European organizations that included Plastics Recyclers Europe and European Plastics Converters committed to recycling 50% of their plastic waste by 2040.

Also this year, Taiwan proposed a strict ban on single-use plastics expected to roll out in three stages by 2030. The news prompted a mixed reaction from the industry. The COO of a biodegradable plastics producer warned that the new ban ignores single-use biodegradable products.

Likewise, members of the plastic industry are criticizing the new EU proposal. PlasticsEurope, a European association representing plastics manufacturers, said there must be more resources dedicated to waste management for better used plastic collection, Petroff reported. “‘Plastic product bans are not the solution,’ it said in a statement, and noted that ‘alternative products may not be more sustainable.’”

The commission’s proposals now head to the European Parliament and Council.

Scottish hostel’s green business benefits

Jessie Mac's environmental and business savings

A luxury Scottish hostel is demonstrating that being green isn’t just helping the environment, it also derives a range of business benefits from its eco-friendly measures.

Located in Perthshire, Jessie Mac’s has implemented a series of environmental practices that are not only cost-effective to introduce but have also benefited their bottom line.

Since opening the doors in 2011, the team behind Jessie Mac’s have been dedicated to finding environmental alternatives to support running a busy hostel located in a refurbished Victorian manse. In 2014 the hostel received the VIBES Management (SME) Award in recognition of this work.

The environmental approach is taken to all aspects of the business from the supply chain down to how they look after guests. Measures include the addition of heat reflectors behind radiators, improving insulation through thick curtains, blinds and reinstatement of shutters as well as implementing secondary glazing. Bags of sand have been added to toilets to save water and pipes have been lagged.

As a result Jessie Mac’s have cut their energy cost by 67% in three years, reduced energy from lighting by 71% in just two years and lowered gas use per guest by 56%.

The hostel is also dedicated to reducing waste with over 85% of it recycled. Food waste is reduced with breakfast pre-ordered while any additional bread is used to feed local birds. Waste in ink cartridges has been dramatically reduced with the introduction of wipe clean, re-usable menus for pre-ordering. The local dog shelter benefits with all redundant towels donated.

Fairtrade and organic products are used and sourced locally, where possible. The team have also pledged to lessen their use of chemicals and have saved money by making their own cleaning products from traditional recipes which work across a range of surfaces and are kind to staffs’ skin.

The team are keen to share their green success with the community and donate free bed nights for every tonne of CO2 saved each year (around 16 a year) to local conservation groups.

Brenda Roddy, owner of Jessie Mac’s, said: “When you walk around our business you probably wouldn’t think that we’re particularly green, but that’s because it’s built in. Our thinking is that it doesn’t matter what size of business you’ve got; the same principles can still apply. We should tackle our energy, waste and chemicals just like the big companies do. It clearly saves us money so it’s just good business sense.

“The VIBES Awards are a great way to get you thinking about what you are doing within the business and also offer a fantastic opportunity to share best practices with other organisations, picking up useful tips and meeting like-minded people and businesses.”

Gillian Bruce, chair of the VIBES – Scottish Environment Business Awards, said; “The VIBES – Scottish Environment Business Awards is focused on recognising and showcasing best practice to allow other businesses to benefit from the knowledge and expertise of industry leaders and to follow their example.

“Jessie Mac’s is a fantastic example of how small changes like better insulation and tracking recycling can not only improve Scotland’s sustainability but can also benefit the business’ bottom line.

“Through the Awards we want to showcase that even the smallest changes can have the biggest impact. Over the years we have seen entries from a variety of sectors and from businesses of all stages and sizes which demonstrates that everyone can play their part in protecting the environment for future generations.”

Steps to Healthy Hotel Housekeeping & Related Business Success

By  Allen Rathey

The American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA) reports there are about 50,000 hotel properties in the United States, providing 5 million rooms, and creating 2 million jobs. In a recent year, guests spent $2.5 billion a day, $105.8 million per hour, $1.8 million per minute, and $29,398 a second. (1)

Allen Rathey

In a competitive market, successful hotels strive to meet guest expectations; including providing a clean, healthy environment.

In a survey of 1,495 American travelers conducted by research firm TNS (2), 86 percent cited cleanliness as very important when seeking a place to stay, and 80 percent would rather give up Internet access than stay in a dirty hotel.

The study, Hotel Cleanliness: Will Guests Pay for Enhanced Disinfection? (3) states: “Room cleanliness is important to hotel guests…[and there is a] marketable segment of guests [female and young travelers] who are willing to pay a premium for guestrooms that are cleaned using enhanced disinfection techniques beyond the normal room cleaning procedures.”

Meeting guest criteria for “clean and healthy” is important. (4)

This article will discuss two kinds of “healthy” housekeeping:

  1. The type that’s good for business, and
  2. That which promotes human health and wellness.

We will show how these are overlapping concepts, and that success hinges on focusing where the circles overlap. (Figure 1)

Housekeeping for Business

A well-run business making a product soon learns to standardize design and production for quality and to control costs.

Since room income is a key revenue stream, standardizing how hotels produce clean rooms, the product, is key to success.

Main barriers are, lack of:

  • Management knowledge of and commitment to best practices.
  • The right tools, supplies, procedures, and standardization.

In other words, the hotel must work on its system for producing clean rooms.

Stephen R. Covey said: “So often, the problem is in the system, not in the people. If you put good people in bad systems, you get bad results.”

How is a “Cleaning for Health” system good business? Understanding best practices is the place to start.

Housekeeping for Wellness

The principles or best practices of wellness-centered cleaning are:

  1. Remove, do not add or stir dust.
  2. Remove, do not add contaminants.
  3. Remove, do not routinely poison germs.
  4. Disinfect touch points (e.g., tv remotes).
  5. Use less-toxic products and methods.
  6. Use residue-free products and methods.
  7. Use fragrance-free products and methods.

A wise man said, “if you’re not cleaning, you’re polluting” which means if you are not subtracting or removing contaminants, you are adding or rearranging them.

Subtracting Dust, Chemicals, Costs

Photo credit: PathoSans

Dust may contain pesticide residues tracked in from outdoors, phthalates from plastics, residues and or mixtures of chemicals derived from 80,000 substances in legal use that have never been tested for long-term safety, heavy metals from industry, asbestos from automobile brake linings at street level, pollen, mold fragments, skin cells, bacteria feeding on organic matter, and much more.

Fragrances in cleaners are unhealthy, as they contain endocrine disruptors, substances that are harmful even in parts per billion or trillion. Eliminate them if you can.

Disinfectants are pesticides and are regulated by the EPA. Use them sparingly and with good ventilation. Disinfect touch points only; use a targeted not shotgun approach.

Chemically-speaking, what hurts microbes often hurts people. Practice removal rather than killing of germs wherever possible and use more benign less-toxic germicides such as hydrogen-peroxide, or hypochlorous formulations produced on-site.

Chemical residues make surfaces dirty, harder to clean, and create harborage for germs as most formulas are biodegradable (i.e., germ food). Residues also enable the growth of surface biofilms which are difficult to remove.

Proper cleaning not only subtracts contaminants; it subtracts costs.

Photo credit: PathoSans

There is a bottom line benefit when you reduce buying packaged chemicals. One operation eliminated aerosols and eliminated more than $10,000 annually from its supply budget. Another switched to on-site generation of ElectroChemically Activated (ECA) solutions—acquiring the equipment without capital investment via a rental program—and saw a dramatic reduction in cleaning chemical costs.

Surfaces without residue look better and are faster and easier to clean. The use of microfiber and ECA solution for wiping chrome, or application of chemical-free dry steam vapor, quickly shows how shiny and low-maintenance chrome can be when not roughened or clouded with a chemical film.

Vacuum cleaners that remove and contain dust rather than resuspend it will lower the labor cost of subsequent dusting.

Cleaners that don’t add a fragrance to the rooms also won’t trigger sensitivities or cause respiratory concerns.

William Fisk, Senior Advisor, Indoor Environment Group, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, estimated the nationwide savings related to improvements in health and worker productivity by providing better indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in U.S. buildings. (5)

Per Fisk:

  • Reduced Respiratory Illness = $6 to 14 Billion Saved Annually
  • Reduced Allergies and Asthma = $1 to 4 Billion Saved Annually
  • Reduced Sick Building Syndrome = $10 to 30 Billion Saved Annually

Conclusion

Standardizing housekeeping practices around a “removal of pollutants” strategy saves money up front, and makes money long-term as guests seek out cleaner, healthier properties.

Based on the foregoing, it’s clear the housekeeping “sweet spot” is where business health and human health meet.

InterContinental San Francisco’s Travel Tool Helps Guests Find Greenest Ways to Destinations

InterContinental San Francisco created a tool that enables their guests to evaluate different transportation options based on time, CO2 produced, cost and a “green rating.” It’s called their Alternative Transportation micro site.
The tool shows the practicalities and costs associated with travelling to particular destinations by walking, biking, taxi, Go-Car (a 2-seat, electric, open car that’s available in San Francisco and San Diego), hybrid sedan, motorcycle and car.
The hotel says that the tool enables guests to, “choose the ‘greenest’ way to get around San Francisco and California, using a car only when it’s necessary.”
For example, if one wants to go to the Orpheum Theater, which is 0.8 miles from the hotel, the chart shows what it would mean for taking the following options:
  • Walk: 15 minutes, 0 lbs. CO2, free, 5 leaf green rating.
  • Bike: 6 minutes, 0 lbs. CO2, rental price, 5 leaf green rating.
  • Public Transportation: 9 minutes, 0.04 lbs. CO2, $2, 4 leaf green rating.
  • Taxi: 6 minutes, 0.58 lbs. CO2, $2.73, 3 leaf green rating.
  • Go-Car: 6 minutes, 0.26 lbs. CO2, rental price, 2 leaf green rating.
  • Hybrid Sedan: 6 minutes, 0.38 lbs. CO2, $0.07, 2 leaf green rating.
  • Motorcycle: 6 minutes, 0.34 lbs. CO2, $.06, 2 leaf green rating.
  • Car: 6 minutes, 0.58 lbs. CO2, $0.10 and 1 leaf green rating.
The website also provides a map for each option, and highlights the route to the chosen destination.
InterContinental San Francisco enables guests to use their Zipcar Toyota Prius Plug-In Hybrid, and get fully reimbursed for the Zipcar membership fee.

Hilton Worldwide Commits to ZERO Soap Waste

Hilton Worldwide Commits
to ZERO Soap Waste

Paving the way for impactful, sustainable change in the hospitality industry, Hilton Worldwide recently announced its commitment to cut its environmental footprint in half and double its social impact investment by 2030—including the initiative to send ZERO soap to landfills.

Hilton properties have been participating in Clean the World’s Hospitality Recycling Program since 2009, contributing to the diversion of 1.7 million pounds of waste from landfills and the distribution of 6.5 million bars of newly recycled soap to children and families in need worldwide. Hilton’s announcement is not only an incredible stride in the industry, but also a great example to all corporations seeking a way to contribute to a greener future and greater social impact on a local, national, and global level.

In addition to eliminating soap waste, Hilton also pledged to “double the amount it spends with local and minority-owned suppliers, and double its investment in programs to help women and youth around the world.” These goals stem from Hilton’s Travel with Purpose corporate responsibility strategy to advance the United Nation’s 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda and 17 Global Goals formed in 2015 to create a better world.

“Hilton’s commitment to soap recycling will save millions of lives,” said Shawn Seipler, founder and CEO of Clean the World. “This is a critical step towards eradicating the top two killers of children that need this life-saving soap to improve their health. I commend Hilton and encourage the entire hospitality industry to follow their lead. Together, we can make a huge difference around the world.”

Clean the World is eager to support Hilton in reaching their goals to protect the planet and drive social change. We envision a day when all hotels and resorts in the hospitality industry commit to recycling all soap and bottled amenities. Together, we can eradicate the top two killers of children under the age of 5, diarrheal disease and pneumonia, through providing life-saving hygiene supplies and WASH education to families around the globe.

For more information on Clean the World’s Hospitality Recycling Program, please visit Clean the World Ireland – Get Involved

IHI Annual Conference – 16th May – Guinness Storehouse

Topics – Brand, Technology, Sustainability – The Future of Irish Hospitality

Book Now by contacting the IHI on 01-6624790 or email info@ihi.ie

IHI Annual Conference Brochure 2018

 

 

In 2018-2019, Iberostar Removing All Single Use Plastics from Its Hotel Rooms

PALMA DE MALLORCAIn 2019, Iberostar Group’s portfolio of more than 110 hotels will be free of single-use plastics, following an initial implementation by the chain’s 36 Spain hotels by June this year. Reducing plastic pollution is one of the key objectives of the sustainability policy on which Iberostar’s business strategy is based. Together with promoting certified sustainable fishing, the protection and conservation of coral reefs and care of the Mediterranean Sea, reducing plastic pollution is one of the key actions included in the “Wave of Change” initiative, part of the Iberostar Group’s sustainability policy that channels its commitment to the environment.

Thanks to this initiative, regular products including bathroom amenities, bags for slippers or clothing and minibar items will be replaced by others made of alternative materials such as glass, compostable cardboard or renewable plant-based items. Eliminating the 1.5 million plastic bottles that will no longer be used in Iberostar hotel rooms each year will prevent the generation of 43 tons of plastic waste in Spain alone.

This ambitious project started in 2017 following an internal corporate audit that detected all the products containing plastic. Plastic straws are a case in point: following a campaign conducted in hotels to cut down on their use and replace them with biodegradable alternatives, usage has been reduced by 10 percent, which in real terms means a reduction of 10 million units. If all these straws were placed in a line, they would extend for about 1,200 miles or the distance between New York and Louisiana. The company’s head offices in Palma, Spain, was the pioneer in eliminating single use plastics. Through initiatives like these, Iberostar Group manages to involve employees, partners and even guests willing to join the wave of change.

The ‘Wave of Change’ Project

The Iberostar Group is fully aware of the vital importance of the seas and oceans for our planet and the survival of humankind. With more than 80 percent of its hotels in seafront locations, the company has drawn up a road map in line with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, focusing especially on people, the driving force underpinning the company’s success, as well as also the environment, and the protection of the seas and oceans. To achieve this latter goal, Iberostar has recently launched an ambitious project under the name “A Wave of Change”, centered on three main areas: the reduction of plastic pollution; the promotion of sustainable fishing; and the conservation of coral reefs and the protection of the Mediterranean Sea. Through the actions included in this project, the company is seeking to raise employee and guest awareness of just how important individual actions are in the daily fight against climate change.

 

CRU publishes results of Energy Consumer Survey – Including SME’s

CRU publishes results of Energy Consumer Survey

 

The Commission for Regulation of Utilities (CRU) has published the results of a consumer survey targeted at measuring consumer engagement, experience and attitudes in the residential and SME electricity and gas markets in Ireland.The purpose of the survey is to provide additional consumer-based insights to the market monitoring activities of the CRU, to contribute to consumer protection polices and codes of practice for energy suppliers and to further empower customers in the competitive energy market.

The survey, which was conducted jointly by Amárach Research and Insight Statistical Consulting, has been carried out annually since 2011.

The 2017 results confirm some continuing trends evident from previous years and support additional research that the CRU has commissioned to identify ways to help customers to compare energy offers.

To read the press release – Click Here

To read the 2017 Consumer Survey – Click Here

GHP.ie Comment:  There is much talk about the “fines” Ireland will pay as we fail to achieve our Climate Change targets for 2020, 2030 and 2050.  Both businesses and householders must stop thinking about this as some sort of national fine – any penalties Ireland has to pay will be paid by consumers in the […]

Read More


LeanPath – Food Waste Minimisation – BY CJ BONGE, MARKETING COORDINATOR // JUNE 4, 2018 New research shows that Americans care deeply about sustainability but are facing an overwhelming feeling of helplessness in the face of such a large issue. The upshot: people are depending on corporations to drive sustainability, and rewarding companies that do with […]

Read More


June 1, 2018 by Alyssa Danigelis    The European Commission is proposing a ban on single-use plastic items like straws and utensils according to draft rules released this week. The legislation, which needs the approval of all member states and the European Parliament, would also require plastic producers pay for cleanup and waste management, CNN Money reported. […]

Read More


May 19, 2017  |  Filed under: Europe,Industry News,Policy, Certification & Business  |  Posted by: Siobhan O’Neill A luxury Scottish hostel is demonstrating that being green isn’t just helping the environment, it also derives a range of business benefits from its eco-friendly measures. Located in Perthshire, Jessie Mac’s has implemented a series of environmental practices that are not only cost-effective to introduce but […]

Read More


By  Allen Rathey The American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA) reports there are about 50,000 hotel properties in the United States, providing 5 million rooms, and creating 2 million jobs. In a recent year, guests spent $2.5 billion a day, $105.8 million per hour, $1.8 million per minute, and $29,398 a second. (1) Allen Rathey In […]

Read More


InterContinental San Francisco created a tool that enables their guests to evaluate different transportation options based on time, CO2 produced, cost and a “green rating.” It’s called their Alternative Transportation micro site. The tool shows the practicalities and costs associated with travelling to particular destinations by walking, biking, taxi, Go-Car (a 2-seat, electric, open car that’s […]

Read More


Hilton Worldwide Commits to ZERO Soap Waste Paving the way for impactful, sustainable change in the hospitality industry, Hilton Worldwide recently announced its commitment to cut its environmental footprint in half and double its social impact investment by 2030—including the initiative to send ZERO soap to landfills. Hilton properties have been participating in Clean the […]

Read More


Topics – Brand, Technology, Sustainability – The Future of Irish Hospitality Book Now by contacting the IHI on 01-6624790 or email info@ihi.ie IHI Annual Conference Brochure 2018    

Read More


PALMA DE MALLORCA—In 2019, Iberostar Group’s portfolio of more than 110 hotels will be free of single-use plastics, following an initial implementation by the chain’s 36 Spain hotels by June this year. Reducing plastic pollution is one of the key objectives of the sustainability policy on which Iberostar’s business strategy is based. Together with promoting […]

Read More


CRU publishes results of Energy Consumer Survey   The Commission for Regulation of Utilities (CRU) has published the results of a consumer survey targeted at measuring consumer engagement, experience and attitudes in the residential and SME electricity and gas markets in Ireland.The purpose of the survey is to provide additional consumer-based insights to the market […]

Read More




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